Intaglio Composites was included in special exhibit at the
National Building Museum

In January, 2004, Intaglio Composites was asked to participate in "Liquid Stone: Architecture in Concrete," a special exhibit at the National Building Museum in Washington, D.C.

(Below) "Brick-Layer in Motion," on display at the National Building Museum, WA, D.C.

What a pleasure to be considered in this important exhibition after the many arduous years spent testing and developing consistency for this new process.

Working with the design firm of PURE+APPLIED out of New York City, it was determined that a work from Eadweard Muybridge,
considered among the most important of the nineteenth-century photographic innovators, would be an appropriate subject mattter for this new and exciting process.

 

Just as Mr. Muybridge was recognized for his innovations in sequential photography, Intaglio Composites believes this new process will have a similar impact on architectural design.

Paul Carlos, designer with PURE+APPLIED said, "We chose the Muybridge print for a few reasons. Since he is considered one of the founders of scientific photography, we wanted to apply one of his works to the relatively new technology of photoengraved concrete. The fact that the exhibit will be held at the National Building Museum we chose the specific print of the bricklayer in motion. We also thought that the ascendancy of these two technologies, photography and concrete, brought about the modern world that we live in and that hopefully the audience would make
these connections.

We saw your work at the museum's staging room and the piece
looks great!"

Just as Mr. Muybridge was recognized for his innovations in sequential photography, Intaglio Composites believes this new process will have a similar impact on architectural design.

(Below) "Brick-Layer in Motion," on display at the National Building Museum, WA, D.C.

 

 

Since this exhibits success was so well received, the princeton press has released a copy of the exhibit. YOu can find it here:

 

 
 

"Concrete is the oldest and the most widely used synthetic building material, currently produced at a rate of over 5 billion cubic yards per year and reportedly the second most consumed substance after water. It is easily taken for granted as the surface of everyday elements of infrastructure such as streets and sidewalks. It is also strongly associated by the general public with utilitarian structures such as parking garages and power plants, along with ubiquitous, often shoddy public and commercial buildings of the mid-twentieth century.

This common and apparently mundane material also, however, makes possible structures of extraordinary beauty and invention. Concrete has been the indispensable medium for numerous architects and engineers who have eagerly explored its sculptural and expressive possibilities. Indeed, reinforced concrete is the quintessential material of the Modern Movement in architecture-its strength and flexibility have allowed unprecedented experimentation with forms, surfaces, and structural frames.

With this in mind, the National Building Museum is organizing a major exhibition on concrete architecture, focusing on current and recent projects in which the use of concrete is essential to the building's architectural expression. The primary goals of the exhibition and related education programming are:

1. To demonstrate that concrete is a uniquely versatile material, used by contemporary architects and engineers to achieve incredibly varied even diametrically opposite-aesthetic and structural objectives;

2. To illuminate the strong historical and continuing interrelationships between concrete and the Modern Movement in architecture;

3. To explain that concrete has particular scientific properties that directly influence the way which architects use the material as an instrument of innovative design; and to describe cutting-edge concrete technologies that may revolutionize architecture and engineering in the future, and to present theoretical designs demonstrating such applications.
The museum expects that the exhibition will excite significant interest within the designs and building industries and related press, while also attracting substantial coverage in the popular media."

We at Intaglio Composites are proud to have been asked to participate in this important exhibit and be among the most highly innovative and creative works like:

Structural Projects:

White Temple; Kyoto, Japan
Simmons Hall, MIT; Cambridge, Ma.
Torre Agbar; Barcelona, Spain

Surface Applications:

Library, Eberswalde Technical School; Eberswalde, Germany
San Jose State Museum of Art and Design; San Jose, Ca.
Ruffi Sports Complex; Marseilles, France

Sculptural Form

Auditorio Ciadad de Leon, Spain
Bergisel Ski Jump, Innsbruck, Austria
Roden Crater, Arizona

and a multitude more. The exhibit ran from June 2004 thru January 2005,


For more info: www.nbm.org